CPR for the Healthcare Provider- compressions

Important information: AHA Quality CPR Consensus Statement

  • Jul 19 2013, AHA

This message is to give notice to the AHA Training Network regarding an AHA Consensus Statement released on June 25, 2013, titled CPR Quality: Improving Cardiac Resuscitation Outcomes Both Inside and Outside the Hospital. The intent of this Consensus Statement is to fill the gap between the existing scientific evidence surrounding resuscitation (as presented in the 2010 AHA Guidelines for CPR and ECC) and the translation of the Guidelines into routine clinical practice. The statement is based on expert opinion and interpretation of existing studies to provide a practical hands-on approach to implementing the 2010 AHA Guidelines for CPR and ECC.

One recommendation in the statement that may generate an interest to the Training Network is that the compression rate of 100-120/min is shown to be optimum for survival. Compression rates above or below this range show decreased survival to discharge. The 2010 Guidelines recommend a “compression rate of at least 100/min” (a change from “approximately” 100/min in 2005).

High-quality CPR has been emphasized since 2005, specifically with adequate depth of compressions, adequate rate and allowing for full chest recoil.

For more information on CPR Quality visit www.heart.org/CPRQuality.

NOTE: One recommendation in the statement that may generate an interest to the Training Network is that the compression rate of 100-120/min is shown to be optimum for survival. Compression rates above or below this range show decreased survival to discharge. The 2010 Guidelines recommend a “compression rate of at least 100/min” (a change from “approximately” 100/min in 2005).  High-quality CPR has been emphasized since 2005, specifically with adequate depth of compressions, adequate rate and allowing for full chest recoil.

In addition, high performance CPR has the compressor to allow the chest to reset or “recoil” at the top of the compression to allow for adequate blood filling and emptying in the heart. Lifting your hands directly above the marker point on the chest allows the ventilator and compressor to see visible chest rise, improving quality of care for the patient.

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